Thanksgiving Day Safety

Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday of the year. Probably thanks in no small part to the fact that turkey is one my favorite foods. Needless to say I will be getting my fill in the coming days.

However, the Thanksgiving Holiday has one of the highest counts of home fires than any other day of the year. Statistics show that home cooking fires are 3 times more likely to happen on Thanksgiving than any other day.

Below are some quick tips to reduce your chances of a home cooking fire this Thanksgiving…

  • Never leave your food unattended while cooking.
  • Use a timer and routinely check whatever you’re cooking.
  • If frying or deep-frying, keep the fryer outside, away from walls, and free from moisture.
  • Never use a glass casserole or lid on the stove or burner, as it may explode from the heat.
  • Ensure that pot holders and food wrappers are a safe distance— at least 3 feet—from warmed surfaces.
  • Position pot handles to the back of the stove to avoid anyone bumping into them.
  • Avoid dangling accessories or loose clothes while cooking.
  • The stove will be hot, keep children 3 feet from the stove at all times.
  • Be sure electric cords from electric knives, coffer makers, plate warmers, and mixers are not dangling off the counter in reach of children.
  • Never douse a grease fire with water, as the fire can thus spread. Turn off the burner, smother the flames with a lid, or douse with baking soda or a fire extinguisher if it’s getting out of hand.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher handy in the kitchen, and know how to use it.
  • Ensure your smoke alarms are connected and working.

I hope everyone has a safe and happy Thanksgiving Holiday!

Gobble! Gobble!

Pamela

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Winter Is Coming

Yes, I am a fan of Game of Thrones. It is something my husband and I were able to binge watch in the evenings over the summer and are looking forward to watching when it airs next year.

With winter quickly approaching it is time to batten down the hatches for the looming cold temperatures and wintery precipitation.

Here is a quick list of things to check off as you prepare for winter…

  • Clean out gutters of any debris for proper drainage and to reduce the chance of an ice damn.
  • Disconnect and drain all outside hoses. If possible, shut off outside water valves.
  • Repair roof damage and remove tree branches that could become weighted down with ice or snow and fall on your house or your neighbor’s house.
  • Wrap water pipes in your basement or crawlspaces with insulation sleeves to reduce the chance of freezing.
  • Clean your furnace and replace the filter to reduce the chance of fire.
  • Have your chimney and/or flue inspected to make sure no animals are nesting there.
  • Test or install smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. Replace the batteries twice a year.
  • If your house will be unattended during cold periods, consider draining the water system.

Whether you live in a single family home, condo, or apartment be prepared for the freezing temperatures and the mounds of snow and ice to come.

By following the simple steps above you can reduce your chance of filing a home insurance claim and have a cozy winter season.

You can find more information about preparing for winter by visiting…

http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/winter/

http://www.ready.gov/winter-weather

http://www.weather.com/safety/winter

Pamela

Halloween Safety Tips

Halloween is quickly approaching. Whether you are trick-or-treating or staying home here are some quick safety tips…

Driving Safely:

  • Drive extra slow and be especially alert in residential neighborhoods. Children are excited on Halloween and may move in unpredictable ways.
  • Take extra time to look for kids at intersections, on medians and on curbs.
  • Enter and exit driveways and alleys slowly and carefully.
  • Eliminate any distractions inside your car so you can concentrate on the road and your surroundings.
  • Drive slowly, anticipate heavy pedestrian traffic and turn your headlights on earlier in the day to spot children from greater distances.
  • Popular trick-or-treating hours are 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. so be especially alert for kids during those hours.

Home Safe Home:

  • To keep homes safe for visiting trick-or-treaters, parents should remove from the porch and front yard anything a child could trip over such as garden hoses, toys, bikes, and lawn decorations.
  • Parents should check outdoor lights and replace burned-out bulbs.
  • Wet leaves or snow should be swept from sidewalks and steps.
  • Restrain pets so they do no inadvertently jump on or bite a trick-or-treater.

Have a safe and spooky Halloween!

Pamela